Archive for June, 2014

Jun 18 2014

Network Security Podcast, Episode 332

Published by under Podcast

We’d suspected this day would come for quite some time, but it’s time to make it official: The Network Security Podcast will no longer be a regular, weekly podcast, Rich Mogull and Zach Lanier will not be a consistent part of the podcast. The podcast will continue in some form, but it’ll be Martin doing any of the publishing.  Which isn’t really all that big of a change anyway.

Basically, all three of us have become incredibly busy in the last year.  Zach has a wedding to plan, a new job and has moved again.  Rich has more business and work than any time in living memory and has had to cut out anything not related to work or family.  And Martin moved to Europe and is on the road close to 50% of the time, further complicating everything.

There will still be microcasts and occasional interviews published through the podcast site, but for the most part we’re shutting down production.  It’s a sad day as we’ve been doing this podcast in one form or another for nearly almost 9 years.  We’ll miss talking to each other and our audience, but the needs of life have intervened and require our attention elsewhere.  You can catch all three of us at various conferences, either presenting or attending and know that we’ve always loved hearing feedback from you.

Keep an eye and ear open as there are already plans in process for what comes next.  You didn’t think Martin could stop talking, did you?

Network Security Podcast, Episode 332 – The End of an Era

Time: 50:58

 

Show Notes:

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Jun 10 2014

If you don’t enter, you can’t win

Let me start by saying Nikita is brilliant and should be showered for accolades for coming up with this, presumably on the fly.

Let me give you some background.  Today was the day the letters about who’s talks were accepted for Defcon 22 came out.  Additionally, all the rejection letters for those not lucky (or well prepared enough) to be chosen to speak came out today.  I know my limitations, and as such, I haven’t submitted a talk to Defcon, other than being on panels and being part of the Defcon Comedy Jam in years past.  I also know I’m a smart ass and I jokingly asked Nikita on Twitter (@niki7a) “Can I get a #Defcon rejection letter?  Even though I never submitted anything.”  And here’s the reply I got.  As a coworker put it “So your talk on not submitting and regretting it was rejected because it wasn’t submitted and the rejection was song lyrics about not regretting your actions with a statement on why they regret rejecting your non-submitted non-submital? Meta.”

Martin,

The review board has reached a decision for your submission. Unfortunately, we will not be accepting your talk, “I didn’t bother to submit, and other regrets in the Hacker scene”, for DEF CON 22. If you submitted more than one paper, it may still be in review. Individual letters are sent out for each paper.

Every year, I have to write a bushel of rejection letters, and it’s never easy to shoot someone down who has put together a CFP. I really respect the effort each applicant puts into their work. The work you do, and the willingness to share your knowledge with the community is incredible, and I appreciate the fact you submitted with us. In a perfect world, every submission would be accepted and it’s contents shared with the community. Each talk has the potential to be the building blocks for a new idea, the solution to someone’s headache, the itch that needs scratching, or the salve for someone else’s.

In the end, I try to provide feedback for you so that when a talk is rejected you can get some sense of why and take that feedback to build a better paper. Hopefully, you can use it to submit it again to another conference, or again with us next year. Either way, Thank you again for the hard work. I’ve put together your feedback from the review board below.

———————————————
 We had to reject simply due to the fact that you didn’t submit. Maybe you will think about that next time. I mean seriously, like, what were you thinking?  I’d like to give you the following feedback as a way to help you understand this oversight on your part, perhaps my words will motivate you to improve your position for next year.

“And now, the end is here
And so I face the final curtain
My friend, I’ll say it clear
I’ll state my case, of which I’m certain
I’ve lived a life that’s full
I traveled each and ev’ry highway
And more, much more than this, I did it my way

Regrets, I’ve had a few
But then again, too few to mention
I did what I had to do and saw it through without exemption
I planned each charted course, each careful step along the byway
And more, much more than this, I did it my way

Yes, there were times, I’m sure you knew
When I bit off more than I could chew
But through it all, when there was doubt
I ate it up and spit it out
I faced it all and I stood tall and did it my way

I’ve loved, I’ve laughed and cried
I’ve had my fill, my share of losing
And now, as tears subside, I find it all so amusing
To think I did all that
And may I say, not in a shy way,
“Oh, no, oh, no, not me, I did it my way”

For what is a man, what has he got?
If not himself, then he has naught
To say the things he truly feels and not the words of one who kneels
The record shows I took the blows and did it my way!

[instrumental]

Yes, it was my way”

Thank you for your time, I can’t tell you how much I appreciate the opportunity you’ve given me to berate you over electronic medium, I can’t wait to see you at the show!

Please consider submitting or not submitting again in the future, and I hope that you enjoy DEF CON this year.

———————————————

Thanks,
Nikita Caine Kronenberg

There may be material here for a submission to Defcon 23.

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Jun 03 2014

Well done, HITB, well done

Published by under Hacking,Personal,Public Speaking

One of the advantages of having moved to the UK from California last year is that I often get the chance to attend conferences I never would have dreamed of attending otherwise.  Thanks to this, last week I was able to attend one of the events I’d never hoped to be able to see otherwise, Hack in the Box Amsterdam.  And I’m very glad I did, as are my children, aka the Spawn.

One of the unique things about this year’s HITB was their choice of keynote speakers, which were all women.  None of them were asked to speak about “women in infosec”, nor were they discouraged from the topic.  But they were all women who are recognized as having accomplished great things in the security field.  Katie Moussouris opened up the conference talking about how the security community is finally at a point where we actually have the influence we’d always wanted, now we have to do something with it.  That and announcing her new role as the Chief Policy Officer for Hacker One, a bug bounty company.  The second day was opened by Jennifer Steffens, CEO of IOActive who called bullshit on the security community for being such a bunch of emo posers and pointed out what a wonderful time it is to be in security as well as illustrating some of the exemplars  in our field.  Both of these security professionals gave keynotes worthy of nearly any conference in the world.

The Haxpo, or vendor area as we generally call it, alongside the conference was also well worth the visit.  TOOOL was in evidence, as were a number of the local hacker spaces, but my favorite part of the show floor.  I picked up a HITB badge, Spawn0 got a TV-B-Gone and we both went to town with soldering irons.  Spawn0 was more successful than I was, as his TV-B-Gone worked while my badge didn’t, most likely due to lack of soldering skills on my part.  He’s just waiting for football (aka soccer) season to get into full swing to test it’s full capabilities.

Will I attend HITB again?  It depends; I’d just come off of two weeks of intensive travel and probably could have used downtime as much as I wanted to see this event.  But I’m very glad I went and got to meet additional members of the European security community.  Maybe next year I’ll try to avoid having so much travel leading up to the event.

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